Cultivating Happiness

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Two recent studies suggest that giving to others makes us happy, even happier than spending on ourselves. One group was instructed to perform a daily act of kindness for the next 10 days. Another group was also told to do something new each day over those 10 days. A third group received no instructions. After the 10 days were up, the researchers asked the participants to complete the life satisfaction survey again. The findings suggest that good deeds do in fact make people feel good—even when performed over as little as 10 days—and there may be particular benefits to varying our acts of kindness, as novelty seems linked to happiness as well. But kindness may have a longer, even more profound effect on our happiness, according to the second study, published online in the Journal of Happiness Studies in April and conducted by researchers at Harvard Business School and the University of British Columbia.

Bookmark When Thomas Jefferson wrote the Affirmation of Independence, he assured Americans of their right to life, liberty, after that the pursuit of happiness. This aim seems to lead many Americans en route for chase after new gadgets and pleasure-seeking pleasures. But what if that accost is wrong? What if happiness comes from aiming to make others blissful, instead of doing nice things designed for yourself?

Shutterstock There are science-linked ways to be happier and healthier. And they're not so hard to do. Jotting along your feelings and star gazing are easy ways to lift your spirits. Here are 22 other easy behaviour to boost your mood that psychologists and social scientists swear by.

Although is becoming happier even possible? These five tips can show you how to get more joy and agreement out of life. The keys en route for happiness Do you, like many ancestor, have a mental list of things you think you need in array to be truly happy? There are many externals our society teaches us to chase: success, wealth, fame, ability, good looks, romantic love. But are they really the keys to happiness? The research says no, at slight when it comes to long-term bliss. Human beings are quick to acclimatize to new circumstances—a quality that has helped us survive and thrive.